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What you do and don't want to see for infants and toddlers

One of my colleagues shared this with me today and I just had to share it here.

This is from NAEYC and provides some really clear ideas and practices that contribute to positive outcomes for children.

Take a look and see what you recognise as familiar to your experiences within infant and toddler settings.

I think that the "what you want to see" are not unrealistic expectations, it is what should be expected as common practice.

What do you think?

http://bit.ly/XPPCba

Replies

  • Donna Rowland (View all users posts) 07 Feb 2013 1:13pm ()

    I agree Justine 'what you want to see" is what I would expect to see...both as a grandparent and a teacher. I have recently been reading the evaluation indicators for ERO review, and was pleased to see their expectations are very much along the same lines. We work on a U2s ratio of 1:4 and generally keep our group size to 8 children. I often feel that is not good enough to enable us to deliver the kind of nurturing environment that we know we should. Last year I put forward a proposal to management that we change our ratios. The following was what I suggested, I also provided evidence and links to the Ministry report

    http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/ece/quality-early-childhood-education-for-under-two-year-olds-what-should-it-look-like-a-literature-review and the Child Commission Report

    http://www.occ.org.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0017/8108/CC_Through_their_lens_21032011.pdf

    The government commissioned this review in response to the increasing numbers of children under two years old participating in out of home, group based early childhood services. There are three key messages that reflect the findings of this literature review

    1. Children under two years old should experience sensitive responsive caregiving that is attuned to their subtle cues.

    2. Early childhood settings for under two year olds should be low stress environments.

    3. When the environmental conditions, attuned teacher child relationships and a holistic pedagogical approach interconnect for the benefit of the child learning and development is considerably enriched. Justine Mason (core education).

    I wasn't listened to last year but I'm thinking it might be time to try again.

     

     

  • Justine Mason (View all users posts) 07 Feb 2013 2:17pm ()

    Hey there Donna, thanks for your comments and links, as I have said somewhere else there is certasinly a growing body of literature in relation to infant and toddler care and "wise" practices that support postive outcomes for our youngest learners......thanks also for sharing your view as a grandparent. This is a very improtant and often unrecognised view.

    I agree with the similarities and connections between the draft ERO indicators, the Literature Review and the Childrens Commission Report, all generated in Aotearoa, glad we appear to be singing from the same song book and to hear that song is being sung in the USA .............

  • Donna Rowland (View all users posts) 07 Feb 2013 3:46pm ()

    I really like that teaching and learning for children under two is being recognised as a specialised areaSmile 

  • Justine Mason (View all users posts) 07 Feb 2013 3:53pm ()

    I remeber the days when infants sat in their car seats all day behind a barrier and had minimal interactions with adults Frown Oh how things have changed thanks to the hard work of alot of people.Wink

  • Justine Mason (View all users posts) 07 Feb 2013 3:53pm ()

    I remeber the days when infants sat in their car seats all day behind a barrier and had minimal interactions with adults Frown Oh how things have changed thanks to the hard work of alot of people.Wink

  • Donna Rowland (View all users posts) 07 Feb 2013 6:03pm ()

    I recall when I started, not so very long ago, children in their high chairs falling asleep because no one was noticing  that they were tired.FrownIm pleased to say that doesnt happen anymore...because we no longer have high chairs, or because teachers notice more?Money Mouth

     

  • Jocelyn Wright (View all users posts) 07 Feb 2013 4:43pm ()

    I am really impressed that NAEYC actually draw a line in the sand re expectations for our youngest learners. While NZ continue to link funding to 'good enough' ratios etc we will not see change. Because of the link to funding, we have established an 'abide by the regs no more' mentality I think. What is the motivation for ECE services to do better? Maybe if we provided easily accessible material for parents, such as this NAEYC document that spells out expectations, the resulting parental pressure could make the difference. After all, parental pressure is cited by many ECE services as reason for doing things like 'ready for school' programmes! Let's use parental pressure to benefit infants and toddlers.

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